Renewables: Trump’s Key To U.S. Energy Dominance?

As a pro-oil administration entered the White House, the oil industry lobby welcomed America-First’s energy strategy, while proponents of cleaner energy argued that the United States “United States Needs a more diversified energy mix in which renewable energies should have a greater participation.

The outgoing president of the pro-oil field Trump argued that more US oil and gas drilling will increase energy independence, create more jobs and ultimately lead to US power domination.

The other view is that, despite the skeptics, climate change is here and a threat, and the United States should use more renewable energy in its energy matrix if global warming is possible and follow the rest of the World in terms of clean energy development.

Last week, the debate was the articles of the Point / Counterpoint Center in The State Journal-Register, in which Jack N. Gerard, president and CEO of the American Petroleum Institute (API), and Michael Kraft, Professor Emeritus of Science Politics and Public and Environmental Affairs of the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay, offered his views on the expansion of US oil drilling to boost jobs.

Gerard, the API, argued that the US oil and gas industry is an “exceptional work creator” that adds billions of dollars to the US economy and stimulate economic activity in all states, whether large-scale producers Of oil or gas.

On the other hand, Professor Kraft emphasizes that the cleaner energy revolution reduces energy costs, reduces greenhouse gas emissions and improves air quality and public health.

In his opinion piece, the IPY president quoted a study by PwC for the Petroleum Institute and published last month, indicating that in 2015 the oil and gas industry has supported 10 3 million full-time jobs And part-time through direct employment and indirect support to other sectors.

This is a 5.2 percent increase over 2011. By 2015, the industry contributed US $ 1.3 billion to the US economy, which represented 7.6 percent of GDP in the United States. As a counterpoint, Kraft also reports on recent studies, but without naming them, shows that employment in cleaner energy production is on the rise.

For example, such a study could be the United States energy and employment report for January this year, which showed that proportionally, solar employment represents the largest proportion of workers in the electricity generation sector, To the construction related to the significant increase of the new Solar Capacity.

According to the Department of Energy’s report, solar technology employs some 374,000 workers, or 43% of the electricity generation workforce. To compare, the use of fossil fuel production accounts for 22% of the total electrical workforce and supports 187,117 workers in coal, oil and natural gas production technologies.

The oil industry lobby naturally requires more federal offshore exploration space. Kraft, on the other hand, sees the future as legislation that promotes a diversity of new energy technologies. He argues that as clean energies become more competitive, the transition to cleaner energy will naturally occur, with well-designed policies to ensure a smoother transition without economic disruption.

Last year, renewable energy sources accounted for about 10 percent of total energy consumption in the United States and about 15 percent of electricity generation. Gérard de API maintains that “expanding access to US energy resources is essential for energy security and economic growth in the future.” It calls for the opening of a larger area outside development because “we let hundreds of thousands of well-paid jobs at the table, let alone increased production of more than a million barrels of Oil equivalent per day.”